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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Wed Dec 10, 2014 11:41 am

Vaso, Darkec, kako vam se ovo čini? Lik prprisuje revolucionarnu ulogu  Amorphisiovom "Tale of the Thousand Lakes" i Tiamatovom "Wildhoney" u procesu transformacije death metal-a u melodičinije i eksperimentalnije žanrove, poput gotika, folka, ambijentala, itd.

Zabavan je tekst, ali, iskreno, mislim da preteruje. Sećam se dobro kad su izašla oba albuma, jer sam i ja u to vreme bio u potrazi za sličnim bendovima i evo šta na tu temu mogu da izjavim: Amorfisov album je bio zabavan, melodičan i sladak, i jeste bio relativno svež, šteta što od tog benda nije izraslo nešto bolje. Pa ipak, kao što i sam autor primećuje, Skyclad beat them to it - it being kombinacija teškog (istina ne death, nego thrash) metala i folk melodija. Ipak, okej, to je kao što rekaoh sladak album koji me čak naveo da kupim i njihov prvenac Karelian Isthmus (i da u rečniku pogledam reč "isthmus"), koji je ortodoksniji death metal, ali uopšte nije loš, naprotiv.

Sećam se i da sam kupio Tiamaov Wildhoney, i toliko me je smorio, da sam ubrzo ugrabio priliku da ga zamenim za neki drugi album (ali da me ubiješ, sećam se koji) - tipičan slučaj metalaca koji se prave pametnij nego što jesu. Razvučen, dosadan (iako kratak) album, sa puno nekih kao flojdovskih momenata. Smor.

U to vreme sam inače već uveliko slušao Type O Negative, Paradise Lost, Cathedral, My Dying Bride, a nanjušio sam i Skyclad, mada je do njih u to vreme bilo malo teže doći - što su sve bili bendovi koji su uveliko eksperimentisali sa metalom i već izlazili iz svojih podžanrovskih niša. Već su uveliko bili izašli ToN-ov "Bloody Kisses" i "SLow, Deep and Hard", PL-ov "Icon" i "Shades of God", Cathedral-ov "Ethereal Mirror" i "Static Majik", kao My Dying Bride-ov "Turn Loose the Swans". Amorfisov i Tijamatov album jesu bili ovog deo trenda, ali nisu bili ni prvi, ni najbolji, ni najorginalniji, a slutim ni najutiacniji.

Svejedno, zabavan tekst.



When Death Metal Got Weird
By
invisibleoranges
Published: October 3, 2014Tags: amorphis, anniversaries, death metal, dlawrence, features, finland, folk metal, sweden, tiamat



Although we’re a little late getting around to it, September 1st marked the twin anniversary of two of the most groundbreaking metal albums of the 1990s: Amorphis’s Tales from the Thousand Lakes and Tiamat’s Wildhoney. Each on its own is laudable for the forward stride it represented for the band that crafted it, but taken together, the two albums function as a crucial pivot point for an entire cohort of European metal bands.
Of course, Wildhoney and Tales from the Thousand Lakes are not all that similar. This is hardly shocking, since different bands take different trajectories, but just a few years prior, Tiamat and Amorphis were swimming in much closer waters. Amorphis was a latecomer to the death metal game, at least as far as the hyper-compressed chronology of the genre’s fitful birth and rapid proliferation in the late 1980s is concerned. Perhaps as a result of that lateness, however, Amorphis’s debut album The Karelian Isthmus is a remarkably powerful, confident statement, and one that already displays more hints at the band’s impending progression than does Tiamat’s relatively underformed 1990 debut Sumerian Cry.
Nevertheless, by the time 1994 rolled around, Tiamat already had three full-length albums of increasingly expansive death metal to their name, compared to Amorphis’s one. In a nutshell, then, the difference between Tiamat and Amorphis in 1994 is that with Wildhoney, it was as if Tiamat said, “We can do this,” while with Tales from the Thousand Lakes, Amorphis said, “Can we do this?” That makes Tiamat’s album the more confident of the two, while Amorphis’s is the bolder.

Tales from the Thousand Lakes is an unimpeachable classic, but it still needs to be said: it’s a bit rough. For every melodic folk riff that oozes class and sorrow, there’s a transition that isn’t telegraphed, and for every bold gesture that merges the burgeoning sound of melodic death metal with the hues of progressive rock, there’s a somewhat jarring juxtaposition of still distant stylistic features – the sometimes new-age synths butting crudely against stately death-growls. Though recorded in Tomas Skogsberg’s Sunlight Studios, Tales is miles away from the buzzsaw crunch that put the studio on the map; as a result, the album feels like the personnel involved are still feeling their way through unfamiliar terrain.
None of this is actual criticism, though: In some ways, this album wouldn’t feel like the timeless landmark it is if it weren’t for the nascency of its best ideas. Amorphis had taken colossal strides between The Karelian Isthmus and Tales, but they were still woodshedding some of it. Even though they have never bettered Tales, the story of Amorphis from ‘94 onward is one of continuous refinement of that initial leap forward. Outside of what it meant for the band, Tales was massively influential both in its wholehearted embrace of a single culture’s mythology (here, the Finnish Kalevala), and for playing folk metal nearly before folk metal was actually a thing (don’t worry; I see you there, Skyclad…).
The best moments of Tales from the Thousand Lakes are where Amorphis spools an outrageously catchy folk melody into a searing guitar lead, and then wraps the whole thing in a gruff death metal counterpoint that buttresses the mournful themes. “The Castaway” achieves a laser focus with that freewheeling folk lead that guides the band through a proggy quiver-full of shifting sections, while the impossibly classic “Black Winter Day” transmutes its sorrowful lead work into unstoppable momentum. By the time the triumphant concluding cadences of “Magic and Mayhem” ring out, with their echoes of Metallica’s finest instrumental suites, any sense of the roughness of Tales’s execution is erased by the awe at its sheer inventiveness.

For Tiamat’s part, Wildhoney also remains every bit the immersive, hypnagogic listening experience. Part of this is a result of the band’s willingness to take their songs in any direction necessary to fit the hallucinatory, ambient mood, but a large part is due to the massively detailed studio wizardry of the production. (On that count, massive credit is due to Waldemar Sorychta, who not only produced the album, but also played keyboards.) If you want to get fussy about it, Wildhoney is pretty difficult to classify as a metal album at all, but its sprawl and borderline arrogant ambition makes it continually thrilling. Pulling in a softened death metal gruffness and a patient, doom-hued stride, it cycles through gothic melodrama, Floydian psych, and capacious electronic flourishes, often all in the same song.
More so than any individual moment, however, what characterizes Wildhoney’s magic is how seamlessly it flows. The transition from “Whatever That Hurts” (which is basically about getting twelve kinds of wrecked on absinthe) into “The Ar,” for example, is an endlessly satisfying move. For a student of metal history, the entire album is littered with gestures that have been picked up and imitated (whether consciously or not): note how the goth-trad crunch and choral backing vocals of aforementioned “The Ar” provide an early skeleton for much of Cradle of Filth’s post-Cruelty & the Beast material, or how Johan Edlund’s impassioned vocal performance on “Visionaire” might have influenced Joe Duplantier of Gojira. If you listen closely, “Gaia” could have helped lay the foundation for funeral doom’s austere template. Best of all might be “Do You Dream of Me?” which is still brittle and eerie after all these years, like David Lynch scoring a wedding dance for skeletons. At every turn, Wildhoney is the sound of a band looking at the tools on hand and saying, “These can be bent to new purpose.”

Beyond what these albums meant for each band, their lasting impact is that they served notice of a collective turning away, or perhaps a new way of pursuing the old animisms. That they came out in 1994 is doubly interesting in the broader context of heavy metal, given that American metal in the same year was roiled by some of the watershed opening salvos of nu and groove metal – Korn’s self-titled debut, Machine Head’s Burn My Eyes, Prong’s Cleansing and to a lesser extent, Helmet’s Betty and Pantera’s Far Beyond Driven. Although Amorphis and Tiamat cannot be said to have had as large an influence on the development of mainstream-facing versions of heavy metal and hard rock as that American class of ‘94, to the extent that the groove and nu-metal eruptions of the early-to-mid-90s flashed white-hot but burned out relatively quickly, the impact of the European class has smoldered longer and dug deeper.
As evidence, just think about the career trajectory of any of these bands: Samael, Therion, The Gathering, Sentenced, Anathema, In the Woods, Rotting Christ, Paradise Lost, 3rd and the Mortal, Moonspell, Ulver, Katatonia, and on and on. Almost without fail, these artists traded in their early brutality for contemplative moderation, gothic melodrama, and an increasingly genre-agnostic pursuit of experimentation.
A cynic might argue that this collective migration to gentler (or at least more exploratory) sounds represents the natural process of a scene’s maturation rather than the outsize influence of either of these two records. Is it plausible that, if Tiamat and Amorphis hadn’t made these albums, some of their peers would have? Of course. The fact that nearly an entire cohort of European death metal bands began to turn away from their rude, primordial birth pangs around the time that these two albums were released is hardly proof that these two albums caused that shift.
So yes, perhaps this was just an inevitable evolutionary step in the development of the genre; still, primacy matters. Your first, most pined-after crush is always the strongest. Beyond that, though, one can trace more direct results: It’s hard to imagine how you get to The Gathering’s masterpiece How to Measure a Planet? or Ulver’s Themes from William Blake’s The Marriage of Heaven and Hell without passing through Wildhoney. Likewise, it’s hard to imagine getting to the late ’90s explosion of folk metal – with the following acts all from Finland alone: Turisas, Ensiferum, Finntroll, Moonsorrow, Korpiklaani – without the spectral visitation of Tales from the Thousand Lakes.
Influence is a diffuse, nebulous thing, but the echoing lament and spacious plaint of these two albums have sounded uncommonly clearly throughout the intervening decades. In the clutter of today’s musical climate, the word “classic” has apparently been revised to mean “thing that may have been pretty okay but with which we can crassly stoke your nostalgia fires.” So don’t call these classics, then; call them old friends, and invite them in again – as if for the first time – to tell their stories.
—Dan Lawrence


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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Indy on Wed Dec 10, 2014 12:01 pm


Postaju mekani...


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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Indy on Fri Dec 12, 2014 10:29 am

Ovo bih da poklonim Vasu, Simetu i drustvu za novaka.



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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Fri Dec 12, 2014 10:50 am

Hvala, Indy, bratiću


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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Ferenz on Sun Dec 14, 2014 11:54 am

Motorhead dolaze na Egzita.
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Sun Dec 14, 2014 11:58 am

Čuo sinoć!!!

Moram da idem!


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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Ferenz on Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:39 pm

Vrlo verovatno da se onda i vidimo tamo.

You can call me Motorhead

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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Guest on Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:42 pm

pogresan kontekst, pogresna publika.

i think i'll pass, ne gleda mi se Motorhead u kastriranom izdanju, nece to biti to.


Last edited by Greshni Vasilije on Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:44 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:42 pm

Ne kenjaj!

Dobro, ti si već gldao Motorhead uživo, ja nisam, tako da ne bih želeo da propustim ovu priliku.


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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Guest on Sun Dec 14, 2014 1:46 pm

William Murderface wrote:Ne kenjaj!

Dobro, ti si već gldao Motorhead uživo, ja nisam, tako da ne bih želeo da propustim ovu priliku.

Gledao i to je bilo bas kako treba od pocetka do kraja, sa sve Lemijevim hirovima, pijancenjem u hotelu Metropol (jebote ladno sam u nekoj selidbi izgubio Lemijev autogram), problemima sa toncem, apokalipticnim okruzenjem Tasmajdana, agrarnim metalcima i hard rokerima u teksas jaknama, bugarskim bajkerima...

ne bih da kvarim uspomenu
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Daï Djakman Faré on Tue Dec 16, 2014 1:07 pm

William Murderface wrote:Vaso, Darkec, kako vam se ovo čini? Lik prprisuje revolucionarnu ulogu  Amorphisiovom "Tale of the Thousand Lakes" i Tiamatovom "Wildhoney" u procesu transformacije death metal-a u melodičinije i eksperimentalnije žanrove, poput gotika, folka, ambijentala, itd.

Zabavan je tekst, ali, iskreno, mislim da preteruje. Sećam se dobro kad su izašla oba albuma, jer sam i ja u to vreme bio u potrazi za sličnim bendovima i evo šta na tu temu mogu da izjavim: Amorfisov album je bio zabavan, melodičan i sladak, i jeste bio relativno svež, šteta što od tog benda nije izraslo nešto bolje. Pa ipak, kao što i sam autor primećuje, Skyclad beat them to it - it being kombinacija teškog (istina ne death, nego thrash) metala i folk melodija. Ipak, okej, to je kao što rekaoh sladak album koji me čak naveo da kupim i njihov prvenac Karelian Isthmus (i da u rečniku pogledam reč "isthmus"), koji je ortodoksniji death metal, ali uopšte nije loš, naprotiv.

Sećam se i da sam kupio Tiamaov Wildhoney, i toliko me je smorio, da sam ubrzo ugrabio priliku da ga zamenim za neki drugi album (ali da me ubiješ, sećam se koji) - tipičan slučaj metalaca koji se prave pametnij nego što jesu. Razvučen, dosadan (iako kratak) album, sa puno nekih kao flojdovskih momenata. Smor.

U to vreme sam inače već uveliko slušao Type O Negative, Paradise Lost, Cathedral, My Dying Bride, a nanjušio sam i Skyclad, mada je do njih u to vreme bilo malo teže doći - što su sve bili bendovi koji su uveliko eksperimentisali sa metalom i već izlazili iz svojih podžanrovskih niša. Već su uveliko bili izašli ToN-ov "Bloody Kisses" i "SLow, Deep and Hard", PL-ov "Icon" i "Shades of God", Cathedral-ov "Ethereal Mirror" i "Static Majik", kao My Dying Bride-ov "Turn Loose the Swans". Amorfisov i Tijamatov album jesu bili ovog deo trenda, ali nisu bili ni prvi, ni najbolji, ni najorginalniji, a slutim ni najutiacniji.

i meni se cini malo prearbitraran odabir ta dva albuma kao kljucna transformativna. tiamat mi je uvek bio bolji muzicki, a tales from a thousand lakes sam vise voleo (iako mi se uvek cinilo kao nesto sto je narucila turisticka organizacija finske)
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Tue Dec 16, 2014 1:24 pm



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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Tue Dec 16, 2014 4:19 pm


Top Albums of 2014, by Jason Bailey
By
invisibleoranges
Published: December 16, 2014Tags: best of 2014, features, jbailey

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I didn’t go into 2014 thinking at year’s end I would be publishing a list of my favorite metal releases. Maybe if I had, I would have made more of a conscious effort to check out new and debuting artists, maybe find some Bandcamp pearls waiting to be revealed to the world. Then again, it’s also possible I might have failed badly at this. You see, a lot of the metal records I really loved this year were quite big, both in terms of length and ideas. Many of these took several close listens for their disparate parts to coalesce into a proper whole. Also, there were a number of veteran artists putting out work of the highest caliber that I found myself compulsively beholden to return to. Many of their albums were quite long and difficult, as well. I’m sure these hypothetical fledgling artists I’ve missed the boat on will become known to me in 2016 or 2017 when they release more well-promoted sophomore albums. I’m sure if I’m still writing about music then, I’ll lament not following said artists from the beginning, blaming this on the prosperous quantity of expansive doom albums and atmospheric black metal solo projects I had to digest in 2014. C’est la vie.
—Jason Bailey
Honorable Mentions:
20. Vaiya – Remnant Light (Natural World Records) [Listen here.]
19. Mournful Congregation – Concrescence of the Sophia (20 Buck Spin) [Listen here.]
18. Incantation – Dirges of Elysium (Listenable Records) [Listen here.]
17. Inter Arma – The Cavern (Relapse Records) [Listen here.] “>Listen here.]
16. Bastard Sapling – Instinct is Forever (Gilead Media) [Listen here.]
15. Electric Wizard – Time to Die (Witchfinder Records) [Listen here.]
14. At the Gates – At War with Reality (Century Media) [Listen here.]
13. Wo Fat – The Conjuring (Small Stone Recordings) [Listen here.]
12. Pallbearer – Foundations of Burden (Profound Lore) [Listen here.]
11. Thantifaxath – Sacred White Noise (Dark Descent Records) [Listen here.]

10. Wizard Rifle – Here In The Deadlights (Seventh Rule)
Imagine Lightning Bolt, Unsane and Corrosion of Conformity all engaged in a backyard Wrestlemania while Blue Cheer’s Vincebus Eruptum is playing, and you may start to get some sense of what Wizard Rifle has done here.
<a href="http://releases.seventhrule.com/album/here-in-the-deadlights">Here in the Deadlights by Wizard Rifle</a>

9. YOB – Clearing the Path to Ascend (Neurot Recordings)
Sure, the mastering job isn’t the greatest, but the same could be said for a lot of albums in the metal canon. What really matters is that the Eugene, Oregon, trio continues their hot post-reunion streak with another impressive slab of psychedelic doom metal. The first voice we hear is that of late British mystic Alan Watts imploring us to wake up; Mike Scheidt takes over from there. From the Immolation-ish growls of “Nothing To Win” to the near gospel-sounding melodies in closer “Marrow,” Scheidt has never sounded more emotional and expressive over the course of a record.

8. Thaw – Earth Ground (Witching Hour Productions)
Earth Ground stands apart from a lot of the great black metal released this year by being A., the work of an actual band as opposed to a solo venture, and B., having a short 40-minute runtime while offering just as much muscle and variety as the heavyweights. There’s the expected tremolo picking and post-BM phrasing in the guitars, but also textures reminiscent of Neurosis or the quieter parts of Ulcerate. Add in some top-tier rasps from vocalist/bassist Maciej Śmigrodzki, and the best (read: subtle) integration of noise elements into metal that I’ve heard in a while, and this is a band I’d expect to break big pretty soon.
<a href="http://thaw.bandcamp.com/album/earth-ground">Earth Ground by thaw</a>
7. Fu Manchu – Gigantoid (At The Dojo Records)
I kind of wrote these guys off after a string of less-than-stellar albums, but the mighty Fu have charged back triumphantly with their best effort since 2000’s King Of The Road. Simply put, Fu Manchu do fuzzed-out space truckin’ stoner rock better than anyone else on the planet: then and now.
<a href="http://fumanchuband.bandcamp.com/album/gigantoid">GIGANTOID by Fu Manchu</a>
6. Spectral Lore – III (I, Voidhanger)
Spectral Lore mastermind Ayloss doesn’t so much make albums as he crafts deep labyrinthine mazes for listeners to get blissfully lost in. III, his best work yet, contains enough progressive bonus features to attract the curious: crawling funeral doom, dark ambient passages, retro guitar noodling, warm Fender Rhodes, Steve Howe-aping acoustic guitar. But the Main Attraction here is the black metal. The sound is just clear enough to pick out the subtleties, but there’s more than enough mid-fi scuzz in the production to appease (most of) the purists. Despite the long running time, this record should be a uniting force in what has become metal’s most divisive genre.
<a href="http://spectrallore.bandcamp.com/album/iii">III by Spectral Lore</a>
5. Triptykon – Melana Chasmata (Century Media)
Most metal bands don’t have the knowhow to make albums that demonstrate a sophisticated level to attention to details like pacing, variety and cohesion. To make a record where each individual song succeeds at fitting a specific slot within the whole, while being mindful of how all the other songs around it function. Most metal bands don’t need to; it’s a genre that’s commonly judged on the basis of how its core elements operate, like the nature of the band’s sound or the quality of the playing. But Tom G. Fischer sculpted Melana as a capital-A album, and imbued it with an unnaturally high degree of emotional access for a heavy metal record. With his eminence, he didn’t need to make an album as good as ever again, but we should be grateful he did.

4. Swans – To Be Kind (Young God Records)
Speaking of living legends pushing themselves into new creative territory in their advancing age, here comes Michael Gira, shouting, barking, crooning and ululating, as he and his bandmates push their sound higher and higher into ekstasis. The cosmic sprawl of modern-day Swans may come from a totally different place than the proto-industrial militancy of Cop, but make no mistake, To Be Kind is an equally savage animal. Those early, brutal Swans records influenced a score of forward-thinking metal bands such as Napalm Death, Godflesh and Neurosis. I can’t wait to hear the future music from the kids having their young, impressionable ears currently warped by this beautiful monstrosity.

3. Panopticon – Roads to the North (Bindrune Recordings)
“Blackgrass.” It’s a catchy enough term to describe the perceived aim of Austin Lunn’s Panopticon project: to synthesize black metal with the folk and bluegrass musical tradition of Lunn’s native Appalachia. In reality, Panopticon, and Roads To The North are much more than that. Roads is as preoccupied with surrendering to the majesties of nature as any Cascadian band, but there are always people in Lunn’s music. When he titles a song “One Last Fire,” you can picture the crowd sitting around it in the night, faces and clothes lit glowing red as they pluck banjos and mandolins. While this album may not be as conceptually vivid as 2012’s Kentucky, I think it’s more musically satisfying on the whole. Lunn turns in what may be the metal drum performance of the year and piles on with righteous black metal and melodeath riffage, as well as all the expected acoustic embellishments. Unlike some people, I’ve always thought it was the right idea to keep the metal and folk elements largely separate. There’s only so much a tin whistle can be expected to compete with such an accomplished musical maelstrom.
<a href="http://thetruepanopticon.bandcamp.com/album/roads-to-the-north">Roads To The North by Panopticon</a>
2. Morbus Chron – Sweven (Century Media)
It’s fitting that this is an album thematically linked to the idea of dreaming—there’s the Franz Marc color palette of the cover art, and the album title is the Middle English word for “dream”—because the sui generis sound world of Sweven is something I’ve long dreamed about. This record blurs the boundaries of early ’70s progressive rock and late ’80s death metal so smoothly that those boundaries cease to exist, informing and flowing into each other like watercolors to create a rich new pigment. There are moments of loud thrashing and stirring lyricism, but never does the record feel like it’s shifting abruptly into one extreme or the other. You couldn’t find a review of Morbus Chron’s first album that didn’t rightfully compare them to Autopsy. That influence is still part of the dream, but it’s hazier now. The better comparison is Voivod; they’re the only other metal band that fitted themselves with a progressive sound that so expertly fused a feel for the classic with a style all their own.

1. Scott Walker and Sunn O))) – Soused (4AD)
I don’t have much to add to my glowing review that I originally wrote for this site. It’s difficult to predict what Soused means for metal going forward. After all, it’s a collaborative album between a drone metal band and a septuagenarian avant-garde vocalist. I do know no other album this year gave me as much to think about—in terms of lyrics, song structures, instrumentation, name it—or resonated so strongly with me. It’s a testament to the things metal can be, to the possible spaces it can explore when it fights back against its binding conservative strictures. Nothing in 2014 made me more proud to be a metalhead.


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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Indy on Wed Dec 24, 2014 8:30 am

Hvala Williamu što me s ovim upozno.



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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Wed Dec 24, 2014 10:04 am

Baš ih sad slušam!!!

Spremam se za koncert u petak



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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Tue Dec 30, 2014 12:27 am



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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Ferenz on Thu Jan 01, 2015 5:15 pm

Dva teška komada - Rale Dinić
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Sat Jan 03, 2015 11:43 pm



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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Thu Jan 08, 2015 5:12 pm



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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Fri Jan 09, 2015 12:45 pm

MetalSucks wants YOU!


MetalSucks is Looking for an Intern!
Wednesday, January 7th, 2015 at 1:30PM By MetalSucks

Interested in an esteemed career in journalism metal blogging? We are looking for a writing intern!
Required skills:

  • unique, developed writing style
  • 2-4 hours per week of free time
  • basic HTML
  • basic image-editing capabilities (i.e. Photoshop)
  • FTP experience a plus but not required

The intern will work remotely, not at the MS Mansion, so location will not be a determining factor.
Interested candidates should send a cover letter and resume to news[at]metalsucks.net with INTERNSHIP in the subject line. Specific details about the internship will be provided to qualified candidates. If we can help you receive college credit for the internship we are happy to do that.


_____
"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Fri Jan 09, 2015 12:50 pm

What ur favorite metal band says about u
Thursday, January 8th, 2015 at 4:00PM By Sergeant D

PERIPHERY
U wear socks with sandals. When ur not spending ur free time maintaining ur Minecraft server or making sloppy playthru videos that get 124 views a year, u leave annoying/creepy dick-related comments on Misha’s instagram.

PALLBEARER
Ur from Kentucky or some other crappy flyover state but moved to NYC 1.5 years ago and now ur a Wino cosplayer. U beat off to pictures of the Decibel flexis and ur parents still pay for the insurance on ur Scion.

AUTOPSY
U live in a basement apartment down by the Greyhound station and get by on ur monthly disability check. Ur hobbies include masturbating and working on the manuscript for ur book (a collectors guide to vhs porn).

MEGADETH
When ur 15 year-old daughter’s friends come over wearing Asking Alexandria t-shirts, u corner them and give them a lecture about how that band is “teenybopper crap” and that Dave Mustaine is THE tightest rhythm player in all of metal and they’re like “daaaaaaaad stop we need to work on our school project.”

METALLICA
ur wife smokes marlboro reds and wears bootcut Affliction jeans that are too small so her muffintop spills out over the top of them, and when she gets into her 1998 burgundy Saturn (backseat 50% covered by mcdonald’s trash), u can see her high-rise 90s-style thong poke out. When she doesn’t feel like ‘dressing up’ she just wears her threadbare Juicy Couture velour tracksuit to walmart, the bottoms of the legs dragging thru the mud puddles in the parking lot while she loudly argues with her sister on a flip phone.

AGALLOCH
u have a masters in creative writing and wait tables at a vegan cafe. one of these days u’ll get ur big break when someone finally notices ur blog about ‘thinking man’s metal.” in ur downtime, u message any girl who has “atheism” in her OKCupid profile.


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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Thu Jan 15, 2015 5:06 pm

Heavy metal bands per 100,000 people



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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by ficfiric on Sun Jan 18, 2015 8:23 pm



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Uprava napolje!
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by William Murderface on Wed Jan 21, 2015 12:25 pm

Singer terrified by prospect of looking after a girl


Marilyn Manson says he's ready to become a father – but he'd hate it to be a girl.


The singer is godfather to his best friend Johnny Depp's daughter and says he has been thinking about having children of his own. But he admits he's terrified about the prospect of looking after a little girl.
Manson tells the Guardian: "I’m the last man in the family, because I don’t have any siblings. So yeah, that is something that I actually have been thinking about.
"I’m the godfather to Johnny Depp’s daughter. He’s my best friend and I gave her her first set of high heels. Unfortunately she was in diapers when I gave them to her. It was awkward when I saw her 14 years later and Johnny’s like, ‘Hey this is Uncle Manson. He gave you your first pair of high heels and changed your diaper.’ That sounds really bad. But it was amazing.
“When your best friend is such a good father and has a similar lifestyle, it makes me think it would be nice to create life. I’d hate it to be a girl, though – because if it’s a girl then you have all the dicks in the world to worry about. If it’s a guy, it’s just one dick to worry about."
Manson also recalls creating a "fake world" for himself as a student and says he wrote an article about the character of Marilyn Manson before he'd even written any music.
He adds: “The first article I ever did was about Marilyn Manson, which I wrote as myself as Brian Warner, and that was in part why I had to have a pseudonym, a stage name.
"I was put in a situation where I had created a Frankenstein’s monster. There was Marilyn Manson, but there was no music yet. I created a fake world maybe because I didn’t like the one I was living in. But that’s what made me make music. I had to fill in the gaps I’d created.”
Manson's new album The Pale Emperor is out today




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"Oni kroz mene gledaju u vas! Oni kroz njega gledaju u vas! Oni kroz vas gledaju u mene... i u sve nas."

Dragoslav Bokan, Novi putevi oftalmologije
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Re: moj drug metalika

Post by Indy on Thu Jan 22, 2015 8:15 am





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Take a day and walk around... Watch the Nazis run your town... Then go home and check yourself... You think we're singing 'bout someone else

Re: moj drug metalika

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