EU - what's next?

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by otto katz on Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:33 pm

U mladosti sam mrzio naše narode i narodnosti i jedva čekao da im okrenem leđa, sad mrzim Čehe. To mi je kazna za moje grijehe.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:37 pm

xie saike wrote:molimo otta za komentar sa lica mesta


https://trusty.hr/zivot/svijet/459-ceski-zaokret-ocima-insajdera-kako-su-i-zasto-cesi-odbacili-brend-dobrodusnog-duhovitog-i-kulturnog-naroda-i-postali-populisti-i-rasisti.html

Kako i zašto? The devil finds work for idle hands. To važi za veliki deo EU i dolazi od ideje da se može samo stajati u mestu i biti "budžetski odgovoran" i sve će biti bajno. Neće. Nikad nije. Ako ne kreiraš događaje, događaji kreiraju tebe.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by William Murderface on Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:42 pm

otto katz wrote:U mladosti sam mrzio naše narode i narodnosti i jedva čekao da im okrenem leđa, sad mrzim Čehe. To mi je kazna za moje grijehe.


Konstanta autošovinizma.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by bruno sulak on Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:44 pm

iskustvo mu je palanacko, odnosno prasko.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Mon Mar 12, 2018 11:45 pm



Drugobohemijanac 
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by otto katz on Tue Mar 13, 2018 12:32 am

Ima ovo što pominje u tom textu, pražská kavárna vs. vesnická hospoda. Uistinu atomi i praznina. Potonji seljaci&budale, prvi sačuvaj me bože češke kulture. Plače to za njemačkom čizmom. Es kommt der Tag.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Tue Mar 13, 2018 10:06 pm

Matteo Salvini predicts clear-out of mainstream MEPs
The leader of Italy’s League party says the EU had turned ‘precariousness into law.’
By Maïa de La Baume 3/13/18, 5:25 PM CET Updated 3/13/18, 9:45 PM CET


STRASBOURG — Matteo Salvini has a message for the European Parliament — we’re coming for this place and we won’t take any prisoners.

The League party leader and potential future prime minister of Italy delivered his tirade against the established mainstream EU parties in the heart of the Strasbourg Parliament.

Once in power, Salvini said he would bring back “a bit of normality” to the European Union and roll back Euro-federalism. European citizens, he said, “will bring back their identity, their countries, their territories to Strasbourg,” in the 2019 election — at which his party is again expected to have a strong showing.

Next year, finally, there won’t be any longer the axis formed by conservatives and social democrats,” he told journalists at a press conference which also included Marcel de Graaf, Harald Vilimsky and Nicolas Bay, other members of the Eurosceptic European of Nations and Freedom (ENL) to which the League is affiliated.
“It will be a wonderful year,” he said.

The League won 17 percent of the vote in Italy’s general election earlier this month and as part of a coalition with center-right parties has 37 percent — not far off the 40 percent threshold necessary to form a government. Former Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi has said he would back Salvini if he attempts to form a government.

Salvini blamed EU policies, which “increased public deficit at historical heights,” turned “precariousness into law,” and led significant Italian companies to lose control at the detriment of foreign multinationals.

He said the revision of EU treaties would be a “priority” and he defended his flagship idea of setting up a “flat tax” in Italy. “It exists in seven countries so nobody in Berlin, Brussels, or Frankfurt can tells us, ‘No, you can’t,’ because others do it,” he said.

He also reiterated that with the League in power, “there will be fewer landings, and more expulsions,” of immigrants because “Europe can’t be reduced to a huge refugee camp.”

Salvini paid tribute to the right-wing populist Freedom Party of Austria for “what they have obtained in government in recent months,” and argued that Austria was “a model and a path to follow” for his party.  The party entered a government coalition in October of last year.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:08 pm

'De si poš'o, zna se ko se pita

Merkel to Throw Cold Water on Macron’s Plans to Overhaul European Union

In a blow to French president, German chancellor to reaffirm skepticism over pooling of fiscal resources and liabilities among eurozone members

By Bojan Pancevski
Updated March 15, 2018 3:20 p.m. ET


BERLIN— Angela Merkel will push back on Emmanuel Macron’s ambitious plans to overhaul the European Union at a meeting in Paris on Friday, reaffirming her country’s longstanding skepticism about the pooling of fiscal resources and liabilities among eurozone member states.

The German chancellor will use her first meeting with the French president since Parliament re-elected her on Wednesday to deliver the bad news, officials from several European countries and senior officials familiar with Ms. Merkel’s thinking said.

Mr. Macron’s pledge to strengthen the EU and buttress the foundations of its common currency was a core part of the message that led to his election last year.
It included giving the eurozone a joint finance minister and a substantial budget to be used for investment and countering economic shocks as well as speeding up the integration of its banking system, in part with a joint backstop and a common deposit guarantee program.

The rejection—the first susbtantial setback for the charismatic French president—will disappoint Paris, EU officials in Brussels and much of southern Europe, where leaders had hoped Ms. Merkel’s fourth government would soften its posture and agree to underwrite a more robust set of fiscal, financial and banking backstops to be deployed in the event of future economic and financial crises.

The EU’s executive arm had hoped to set up a deeper economic and monetary union that would protect the eurozone against crises by mid-2019, ahead of EU elections.

The sovereign-debt crisis that engulfed the eurozone in 2010 nearly caused it to break up. But with growth picking up, employment falling across the bloc, and the tough domestic overhauls and fiscal belt-tightening Germany had always championed appearing to bear fruit, German officials say Berlin is less convinced than ever that the significant steps proposed by Mr. Macron are necessary to stabilize the currency area.

As part of the deal to seal the formation of her new government, Ms. Merkel handed the finance ministry, which is responsible for eurozone matters, to the Social Democratic Party, a left-leaning party that has historically been strongly in favor of transferring sovereignty to Brussels. But Berlin officials expect Olaf Scholz, the new minister, to hold the hard line set by his intransigent predecessor Wolfgang Schäuble.

While the chancellor won’t reject all Mr. Macron’s suggestions outright, she will insist most should be long-term objectives to be implemented by future governments, the officials said. Ms Merkel wants to shift the focus to what she sees as more pressing challenges, such as the need to manage illegal migration and securing the EU’s porous external borders.

In a television interview on Wednesday night, Ms. Merkel said Germany was ready to increase its contributions to the EU budget, partly to make up for the expecting departure of the U.K. from the bloc, but without accepting guarantees for other countries’ liabilities—from public debts to bad loans in banks’ balance sheet.

“What we don’t want is, so to speak, to mix up liabilities and responsibility, or rather to simply mutualize debt, without becoming competitive,” she said. The main responsibility, she added, lay with the nation-states.

Since Mr. Macron first floated his ideas, the French government has softened its demands by stretching them over an extended horizon. Under this new approach, the most ambitious measures, such as the appointment of a joint finance minister and the creation of a eurozone budget, wouldn’t come for several years.

“We think it is essential to have a budget for the eurozone to stabilize the zone in the case of macroeconomic and asymmetric shocks. It is also necessary to finance certain investments that will be just for the 19 countries. But for us that remains on the horizon,” a senior French official said this year.

People close to the chancellor said she still strongly supported Mr. Macron’s efforts in the past year to overhaul the French economy and that she would back limited steps to deepen eurozone integration.

Among those, Germany would agree to convert the eurozone’s bailout fund into a permanent European Monetary Fund. But she would insist it stay subject to the control of national parliaments instead of that control being transferred to EU institutions, as suggested by Paris.

Germany isn’t isolated in its skepticism. A group of eight smaller countries that are net contributors to the EU budget—meaning they pay more into the common pot than they receive in EU subsidies and funding—have emerged as strong opponents of Mr. Macron’s plans.

The countries led by the Netherlands issued a common warning last week against “far-reaching transfers of competence to the European level.”

Dutch Finance Minister Wopke Hoekstra on Wednesday said Ms. Merkel’s key confidant Peter Altmaier was present when the text was being formulated. Mr. Altmaier attended two meetings of the signatories, Mr. Hoekstra told journalists on Wednesday.

“Germany, in my view, supports most, if not all, of what we have stated. Germany is satisfied with both the initiative and the content,” Mr. Hoekstra said.


https://www.wsj.com/articles/merkel-to-throw-cold-water-on-macrons-plans-to-overhaul-european-union-1521141449
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by William Murderface on Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:13 pm



Bravo za SPD! Bravo! Tako radi odgovorna levica!


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by William Murderface on Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:13 pm

Jebeni GroKo će sjebati sve. Uključujući i sebe, ali to je slaba uteha.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Thu Mar 15, 2018 10:48 pm

Hoekstra!
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Quincy Endicott on Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:44 am

Mislim da je Makronu jasno vec neko vreme da nema od tog posla selameta, zato se i razmileo po Indijama i Afrikama.

Jbg, ako nece EU onda je nece ni biti.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:50 am

Pa oće oni EU, ali...
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Quincy Endicott on Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:52 am

tako kako oni (Nemci) misle nece vise da moze


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Fri Mar 16, 2018 11:54 am

Ma znam. Nekakav kompromis ako ne naprave samo ce jednog dana neka velika država izaći iz evra. A na sta bi licio nemacki izvoz sa nekakvim "severnim evrom" to ne verujem da bi im se svidelo. Slepilo.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:12 pm

Mislim, vraćamo se na on staro - Nemci hoce da vladaju a da ih to ne kosta ozbiljno. To ne biva. Ako nikog drugog nek pitaju Amere ako im nije jasno. Sad da li ce te kostati kroy pravljenje ozbiljne vojske ili kroz ovo sto predlaže Macron (ili oba), to mogu da biraju, al da ozbiljno košta - to mora.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:23 pm

Sada kada mocni Francuzi krenu...

Severni evro nije problem, stavise, ali bi neki drugi problemi mogli da se pojave u tome slucaju ali ne nuzno na dugo neresivi, barem sto se tice izvoza.

Ali nista od toga. Bice neki kompmis koji ce izgledati slatko ali ce raditi za Nemce i to je to.
Dokle traje neka traje.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:32 pm

Nemačka pozicija je zaključana sa više strana.

Oni nemaju preveliku geopolitičku ambiciju da budu hegemoni i da budu doživljeni kao takvi. Razlozi iza toga su brojni.

EU je teško promenljiva na bilo koji bitniji način, promena ugovora (što bi npr jedino omogućilo mutualizaciju duga) zahteva konsenzus članica što je faktički nezamislivo.

Plus, nemačka ekonomija je našla kakav takav sweet spot u ovakvom poretku, uz blago ali stabilno rastuću političku moć koja tek ponekad izaziva podozrenje. Drugim rečima, Nemačka nema motiv da menja stvari, njoj je dobro i ovako.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by bruno sulak on Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:35 pm



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The law provides us structure to guide us through paralyzing and trying times. But it requires us a vision to its procedures and higher purposes. Before we assume our respective roles in this enduring drama just let me say that when these frail shadows we inhabit now have quit the stage we'll meet and raise a glass again together in Valhalla.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Fri Mar 16, 2018 12:51 pm

Gargantua wrote:Nemačka pozicija je zaključana sa više strana.

Oni nemaju preveliku geopolitičku ambiciju da budu hegemoni i da budu doživljeni kao takvi. Razlozi iza toga su brojni.

EU je teško promenljiva na bilo koji bitniji način, promena ugovora (što bi npr jedino omogućilo mutualizaciju duga) zahteva konsenzus članica što je faktički nezamislivo.

Plus, nemačka ekonomija je našla kakav takav sweet spot u ovakvom poretku, uz blago ali stabilno rastuću političku moć koja tek ponekad izaziva podozrenje. Drugim rečima, Nemačka nema motiv da menja stvari, njoj je dobro i ovako.

Bravo kolega.
Samo treba reci da je Francuska u padu...
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:27 pm

Pa Nemačka nije sama nešto zaslužna, više su joj poslužile okolnosti.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Fri Mar 16, 2018 1:35 pm

Ne bih se bas slozio.
Svabe su dobro znale sta rade kada su stvarali evro kao monetarnu uniju bez fiskalne. Veruj mi.
I sve ono pumpanje kredita na periferiju evrozone zbog veceg izvoza...
Nisu oni mutavi, u stvari, vrlo su pokvareni i uvek imaju taj rasisticki odnos...
Istine radi, oni su bili spremni da svojoj populaciji obore standard zbog toga ali sta zabole nekog direktnora folksvagena ili basf-a za to osim sto se obradovao?
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Fri Mar 16, 2018 2:48 pm

EU COMMISSION PUBLISHES LIST OF U.S. GOODS THAT COULD BE SUBJECT TO TARIFF RETALIATION, SEEKS INDUSTRY VIEWS
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by xie saike on Mon Mar 19, 2018 8:54 pm

ozbiljna levica, a ne folirant borko stefanovic ili deca u majicama sa petokrakama i ajfonima
Luka Mesec je predsedniku vlade v odhajanju zastavil vprašanje o napovedani porabi 1,2 milijard evrov za oborožitvene zahteve NATO. Ob tem je opozoril: "1,2 milijardi evrov je več, kot je znašal proračun Ministrstva za zdravje v zadnjih 8 letih, 1,2 milijardi evrov je več, kot bo stal drugi tir. 1,2 milijardi evrov je znesek, za katerega bi lahko zgradili dvanajst pediatričnih klinik."

V Levici nasprotujemo načrtu vlade, da za oblikovanje dveh srednjih bataljonskih bojnih skupin, ki sta prioritetna cilja Nata za Slovenijo, porabi kar 1,2 milijarde EUR. Zato smo vložili predlog za razpis posvetovalnega referenduma, na katerem bi se lahko državljani izrekli proti.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Tue Mar 20, 2018 3:03 pm

https://www.euractiv.com/section/central-europe/news/austrian-experts-central-europe-is-the-future-of-europe/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=Social&utm_source=Twitter#link_time=1521552523

Austrian experts: Central Europe is the future of Europe
By Herbert Vytiska (Vienna) | EURACTIV Germany | translated by Alexandra Brzozowski
14:25

Austria’s accession to the Visegrád Group is not up for discussion and enlargement is being rejected by the four states themselves. However, the Viennese government should maintain and intensify cooperation, the director of the Diplomatic Academy, Emil Brix, told EURACTIV in an interview.

Brix imagines that Austria might also involve one or two other EU countries – such as the Netherlands and a neutral state – into a special cooperation. Ireland, for example, which will be particularly affected by Brexit, should be brought more into the centre of Europe.

Iron Curtain separated Europe into two worlds

In the coming year, it will be 30 years since the Iron Curtain fell, starting with Hungary on June 27, 1989, along the border with Austria. At the time, the Austrian Foreign Minister Alois Mock and his Hungarian counterpart Gyula Horn symbolically and publicly cut through the barbed wire fence at Sopron, which had divided Europe for 40 years and separated the two political systems from Grense Jakobselv in the north of Norway to Trieste on the Adriatic.

The political term “Iron Curtain” was first mentioned in 1920 by the Briton Ethel Snowdon in her travelogue on Bolshevist Russia. Today, it is mostly attributed to British Prime Minister Winston Churchill, who telegraphed to U.S. President Harry S. Truman on 12 May 1945, that “from Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the Continent.”

In 1989, the Cold War era came to an end and Europe began to grow together again. The people’s democracies turned away from Communism and from Moscow, changed into new democracies and wanted to join the European Union (and NATO).

This was accompanied by a change on the European map whose geopolitical importance for the EU has not yet received the weight it deserves. Brix, along with Erhard Busek, former Austrian vice-Chancellor and foreign minister who is now the head of the Institute for the Danube Region and Central Europe, are together calling for this recognition.

Central Europe has shifted to the East and Southeast

The book “Central Europe revisited”, recently published by Busek and Brix, says: “Central Europe has shifted East and Southeast since the end of the ideological East-West division of Europe. It fills again the entire space between Germany and Russia. Central Europe is the future of Europe”.

Emphasising the importance of paying more attention to Central Europe, the book says “nobody knows where exactly the journey is going.”

This can be seen, among other things, in the questioning of traditional ideas of democracy (by Orbán in Hungary), tendencies towards stronger leaders (Vučić in Serbia, Kaczyński in Poland), and the general weakening of democratic institutions (in which parties mutate into movements).

And the Internet too would not lead to the “final triumph of direct democracy,” but with “Facebook & Co. rather create instruments of aggressiveness, that lead to polarisation.”

No “Mexit” in the centre of Europe

Central Europe expert Busek, who maintains many contacts in the region, sees no danger of a “Mexit” in the centre of Europe. Poland, as well as Hungary, is dependent on EU support.

None of the Visegrád states wants to leave the community, but the attacks against their respective neighbours (and Brussels) have increased, according to the findings. Moreover, “before and after the fall of the Iron Curtain there have been undoubtfully more initiatives for the establishment of neighbourly relations than there are today.”

According to the authors, it is above all areas of science and culture, art and tourism, as well as infrastructure measures, that tolerate more intensive cooperation.

Engage against the divide of Europe

However, there is a lot of catching up to do when it comes to political rapprochement. In the public realm of the Central European states, the critique of the EU and of foreign influence is more and more on the rise. Whereby the critique is also often based on prejudices that are used by populist politicians to influence the electorate.

“It is important that the civil society of Central European countries strikes up the conversation about those topics,” reads the message of Busek and Brix. “The development of democracy in Central Europe will be more defining for the future of Europe than we have assumed until present. It has an impact on the functioning of the EU; on the future ideas of national identity and patriotism.”

Austria takes on a special task here. On the one hand, because following the fall of the Iron Curtain, it has moved from the eastern edge of free Western Europe to the centre of the new Europe, and on the other, because of its traditionally and historically strong ties to this region.

“It is more important today than ever since the days of the Cold War to oppose the disappearance of the idea of Central Europe. Austria must stand up against this split in Europe. It is time for Austria to turn its attention more to Central Europe because only then can a truly common Europe emerge,” the book said.

Re: EU - what's next?

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