EU - what's next?

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Wed Jan 03, 2018 2:37 pm

Hungary, Poland want a strong say in Europe's future: PM Orban

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Filipenko on Wed Jan 03, 2018 3:34 pm

Pre ce biti ovako...





I ostace zapamceno ovako...


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Thu Jan 04, 2018 11:31 am

Why the once-durable Merkel may not last much longer
Anne McElvoy
The chancellor’s need to win back far-right voters is hard to square with her previous embrace of open borders
Thu 4 Jan ‘18 07.00 GMT


Angela Merkel’s New Year address on German television has acquired all the familiarity of the Queen’s Christmas speech. So much so that one newspaper ran a front page showing the chancellor’s 12 years in shiny-jacket attire under the headline, “Can the Social Democrats put up with another one of these?”

The needling of the centre-left Social Democrats (SPD), for preparing to support Merkel’s fourth term in office, highlights a more irreverent tone towards “Mutti”, as she restarts stalled talks to hammer out a new coalition.

The chancellor has been attacked by some of her own former supporters for her unwillingness to be more open about the practical implications of absorbing the 2015 wave of refugees, and for allegedly failing to identify warmly enough with the victims of the Christmas terror attack in Berlin in 2016. In other words, she is being treated like any other long-stay politician showing signs of fatigue. On a road trip through Germany I heard grumbles and frustration about a chancellor who only a year ago was hailed as virtually superhuman.

It is now just over three months since an election which saw Merkel and her SPD rivals punished at the polls, a sharp rise in support for the far right, and votes scattered liberally across smaller protest parties, from the free-market liberals in the FDP to the Greens and leftwingers Die Linke. The public is wearying of coalition talks that have failed to yield either a “Jamaica” coalition of the Christian Democrats, the FDP and the Greens, or (so far) a grand coalition of the Christian Democrats and SPD.

Merkel’s ability to choose a coalition deal that suits her is less powerful than it was. For the first time, her message to the SPD – “the world won’t wait for us” – was part chiding, part imploring. The party, in turn, is hamstrung by leader Martin Schulz, who took them down to a mere fifth of the vote, and foolishly promised after the election not to re-enter a Merkel-led coalition.

Together with Tilo Jung, a video blogger, I hit the autobahns from Berlin into Mecklenburg in the old East – close to the wastelands where Merkel grew up. As a journalist, I covered Germany’s reunification and believe Merkel helped define the positive tone and stability of Germany after 1990. Tilo, by contrast, is impatient with her technocratic language and fudging of awkward choices. Conversely, he is keenest on Merkel because of her response to refugees. I admire the values that led her to act as she did, but fret that, like many liberals now, she is less good at addressing the difficult questions that arise from immigration (whether through open borders or single-handed refugee largesse).

Many insights that struck me came from encounters with Germans beyond the country’s serene self presentation in Berlin – like the Mecklenburg workers we met who worried about low wage levels, and a young couple commuting huge distances to find higher salaries in the old West. We encountered a successful middle-aged voter for the far-right Alternative für Deutschland who had previously been a Merkel loyalist. How she intends to win back such voters (the AfD has high levels of popularity among the under-44s), while remaining true to the spirit of her commitment to open borders in 2015, is a mystery.

The popularity of the small and insurgent parties is causing headaches on the centre-left, as well as the centre-right. Manuela Schwesig, a Mecklenburg SPD politician, talks in forthright language about the failings of coalition politics. One nascent organisation, SPD Plus Plus, is calling for a fresh start and a bigger voice for the grassroots.

For all the barnacles that now attach to her leadership, Merkel will not shrivel as a political force in 2018. Only she has the votes and personal heft to bring together a government. But the strains of the coalition will be intense, and her leadership will be more fraught than ever. It will rely on her rightwing Bavarian sister party, which will demand a larger say in economic matters, with the SPD less inclined to sign up to another round of Merkelism just for a seat at the cabinet table. Her toughening of tone on migrant checks and removal of failed asylum seekers risks appearing erratic.

It is no longer absurd to suggest Theresa May could outlast Merkel in office. So the task for Germany’s durable leader will be to decide more precisely what her chancellorship should represent at home, as well as on the European stage.

Germany’s politics is no longer the stuff of soporific speeches and a supine parliament – the shift reflects a more fragmented society and a more assertive electorate. Merkel will need to either use her wiles to rise to a new German reality, or begin to make way for the post-Mutti era.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/jan/04/angela-merkel-chancellor-far-right-voters


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Fri Jan 05, 2018 4:37 am

Nacionalni interesi, nacionalna bezbednost...


Berlin to probe Chinese deal for German aerospace group Cotesa

Guy Chazan in Berlin
January 4, 2018

Move highlights worries over Beijing’s growing M&A activity in Germany’s high-tech sector

Berlin has intervened in the takeover of a small but innovative German aerospace company, using a new law that gives it enhanced powers to block Chinese deals in strategic sectors of the economy.

But Germany’s economics ministry has now stepped in to put the transaction on hold. A ministry spokesman confirmed it was investigating the deal “to check whether it complies with Germany’s law on foreign trade”.

The earlier version of Germany’s law on foreign trade allowed the government to block a company from outside the EU acquiring more than 25 per cent of a German entity if the deal endangered public order or national security. It largely applied to defence industry enterprises.
But the law has since been expanded to cover a broad range of companies operating in “critical infrastructure” such as electricity and water suppliers, hospitals and transport, as well as advanced defence technologies. The government also has up to four months to investigate takeovers, from two months previously.



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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by William Murderface on Mon Jan 08, 2018 11:56 am

What is the way forward for Germany? The worst solution would be another Grand Coalition between Merkel and the Social Democrats. It would perpetuate immobility, anesthetise political conflict and open the path to the Austrian Model of a populist take over. This cannot be in the interest of Germany, Europe or the World. Germany needs a strong and polarising opposition.
New elections are also not a promising solution, for it is not clear how voters would react to the political bickering between parties that have failed to form a government. Nothing would be worse than a new parliament with a similar deadlock.
This leaves the possibility of a minority Merkel government, possibly in coalition with the Greens. The inclusion of the latter would strengthen Germany’s will to reform the European Union after Brexit. This government would seek the support of other parties issue by issue. This is where Merkel’s lack of principled firmness becomes an asset. It would also return power to the Bundestag, Germany’s Parliament has lived for too long in the shadow of Grand Coalitions. This would be good for Europe and for German democracy.
https://www.socialeurope.eu/merkels-failure


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Tue Jan 09, 2018 4:46 pm

EU sets date for next wave of enlargement


By Andrew Rettman
BRUSSELS, Today, 09:29


The EU is preparing to pledge a 2025 deadline for the next wave of enlargement, but Balkans disputes could hold things back.

"The Western Balkans partners now have a historic window of opportunity. For the first time, their accession perspective has a best-case timeframe," the commission is to say in a strategy paper to be adopted either on 7 or 14 February.

"With strong political will, the delivery of real reforms, and lasting solutions to disputes with neighbours, Montenegro and Serbia should be ready for membership by 2025," the text is to add, according to a draft seen by EUobserver.

It aims to say Albania, Bosnia, Macedonia, and Kosovo "should also be well advanced on their European path by then", or, according to alternative words in brackets, that their "negotiations … should be well advanced."

The paper marks a shift in tone after commission head Jean-Claude Juncker said in 2014 there would be no EU enlargement in the foreseeable future.

Serbia and Montenegro have already opened accession talks.

Albania and Macedonia are hoping to do it this year, if Macedonia can resolve its name dispute with Greece.

Bosnia is angling to gain EU "candidate" status, while Kosovo is considering to formally ask to be named a candidate.

The commission paper warned that local disputes could hold back what it called its "ambitious" timeline.

"The EU cannot and will not import bilateral disputes. This is why all the Western Balkans partners concerned must resolve such disputes as a matter of urgency," the draft said.

It proposed that border issues should be solved by international arbitration, for instance in The Hague, and that any rulings must be "binding, final" and "fully respected".

Thorny bramble

The thorniest dispute is Serbia's non-recognition of Kosovo's independence.

The commission paper said, nodding to Belgrade, that "frontrunners on the EU path have a strategic interest" in advocating the EU "aspirations of their partners".

It added that a "comprehensive normalisation of relations between Serbia and Kosovo in the form of a legally-binding agreement" was "crucial" for both their EU prospects.

Kosovo's problems go beyond Serbia, however.

Five EU states also do not recognise its independence.

Meanwhile, its new leader, Ramush Haradinaj, has vowed to block an EU tribunal in The Hague on Kosovo guerrilla war crime allegations.

The US, on Monday, refused to grant him a visa to attend an event in Iowa on 11 February in what looked like punishment.

A Serb general said the same day that Nato had "specific" information on a "security threat" in Kosovo due to the court row.

Name calling

The Macedonia-Greece name dispute could be resolved by June.

Greece has blocked Macedonia's EU and Nato entry talks for decade on grounds that Macedonia's name implied a claim to a Greek region of the same name.

But Skopje and Athens say they are close to reaching a UN-mediated deal.

"We have a window for a solution," Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras said on Monday after holding talks with Macedonian leader Zoran Zaev.

Zaev said: "I believe there's a chance by the end of the middle of 2018 to find a settlement."

The Greek foreign minister said Macedonia should adopt a composite name with a geographical qualifier. Zaev declined to comment, saying: "I don't want to ruin the procedure of the imminent negotiations".
Laundry list

The list of Balkans disputes goes on 20 years after the wars there ended.

Croatia and Slovenia, which are already EU members, cannot agree on their maritime border in what Juncker said on Monday could hold back wider enlargement.

Croatia also has open border talks with Bosnia, Montenegro, and Serbia.

Kosovo had agreed on its border with Montenegro, but Pristina is now refusing to honour the accord.

Juncker's Balkans agenda is taking shape under Bulgaria's six-month EU presidency, which started on 1 January.

The EU will hold a Western Balkans summit on 18 May in Sofia - the 15th anniversary of a previous EU event in Thessaloniki, Greece, when member states first promised to take in the region.


The commission also aims to publish its regular progress reports on the Balkans aspirants in April.

"We will decide … in the next eight, nine months how to proceed with each and every of these countries," Juncker's spokesman said on Monday.

Russian spoiler

Juncker's plans are also taking shape in the context of increased Russian activity.

Russia is flooding Balkans media with anti-EU propaganda and stoking Serb nationalism with arms deals.

Last year, suspected Russian spies were behind a failed coup in Montenegro designed to stop it from joining Nato. The Albanian foreign minister, Ditmir Bushati, recently told EUobserver he expected similar tricks in Macedonia this year.

"This is a possible scenario," Bushati said.


https://euobserver.com/enlargement/140478


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Hubert de Montmirail on Thu Jan 11, 2018 3:31 pm

Nigel Farage says he's warming to a second EU referendum.






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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Guest on Thu Jan 11, 2018 4:00 pm

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Gargantua on Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:18 am

ecce groko

BERLIN — Negotiations to form a new German government cleared a key hurdle early Friday after the leaders of Angela Merkel’s conservative bloc and the Social Democrats reached a preliminary agreement to pursue formal coalition talks.

The early-morning breakthrough came at the end of a 24-hour round of talks that had snagged over refugee policy, government spending and taxes. Party leaders were expected to provide details of their agreement at a press conference around midday Friday after internal deliberations.

While the agreement boosts the chances for a renewal of a “grand coalition” between the center-left and center-right, negotiators face a circuitous path towards a final deal. Before they can proceed to formal talks, the SPD leadership needs to secure the agreement of a special party convention, scheduled for January 21.

And even if formal talks result in a deal, a process that is expected to take several weeks, the SPD has insisted on putting the final coalition agreement to a vote of its membership. That means Germany is unlikely to have a new government until late March at the earliest.

If the two sides fail to form a coalition, a new general election is likely.
...


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Filipenko on Fri Jan 12, 2018 11:58 am

Habemus Babašvabam?

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Sat Jan 13, 2018 11:02 pm

Bulgaria joins Poland in court case against Commission-led crackdown on coal

Bulgaria will join Poland in an appeal against a European Commission decision to impose stricter limits on toxic pollutants coal-fired plants emit, the government said on Wednesday (10 January).
The move drew criticism from activist lawyers ClientEarth, who accused the Balkan country currently holding the EU’s rotating presidency of seeking to undermine EU rules designed to protect people across the bloc from toxic pollution.
Bulgaria, where coal-fired power plants produce about 40% of its electricity, has said the new rules pose risks to its energy security and economic competitiveness.
“We will make all efforts to protect the interests of the coal mines and the big thermal power plants,” Energy Minister Temenuzhka Petkova said in a statement after the decision.
Poland has vowed to stick to coal despite the EU’s requirements to cut carbon emissions partly because the country relies heavily on coal for power generation. It filed a court case in the European Court of Justice on 11 October 2017.

https://www.euractiv.com/section/air-pollution/news/bulgaria-joins-poland-in-court-case-against-commission-led-crackdown-on-coal/
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by xie saike on Mon Jan 15, 2018 1:51 pm

opa, znaci oko 2062. godine mozemo ocekivati ovo u praksi



European Commission will hold a 1st roundtable in Brussels today with mobile phone operators in the Western Balkans. first step towards pushing for reduced and then removed roaming charges between the region & the EU. #Albania, #Bosnia, #Kosovo #Macedonia, #Montenegro, #Serbia


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:11 pm

Social Democrats in east reject proposed German coalition

BERLIN — Members of the center-left Social Democratic Party in Germany’s Saxony-Anhalt state have voted against a proposed national-level coalition with Chancellor Angela Merkel’s bloc.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/europe/social-democrats-in-east-reject-proposed-german-coalition/2018/01/13/6f556f4a-f886-11e7-9af7-a50bc3300042_story.html?utm_term=.e2e5c4c2e4b0
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Filipenko on Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:15 pm

Slovenske zemlje moraju imati urodjenu odbojnost prema Babasvabi, a bivsa tzv. Istocna Nemacka to svakako jeste.



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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Mon Jan 15, 2018 3:22 pm

Zar baba-svaba nije iz Istocne Nemacke?
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Filipenko on Mon Jan 15, 2018 4:10 pm

Sotonina trulez-klica na svetoj zemlji.

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Zuper on Mon Jan 15, 2018 4:21 pm

German SPD Support Drops to 18.5%, Lowest in Poll History: Bild

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:29 pm

Zuper wrote:Zar baba-svaba nije iz Istocne Nemacke?

I četvrtinom slovenskog porekla ako se ne varam. Mislim, očev otac
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by паће on Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:30 pm

KinderLad wrote:
Zuper wrote:Zar baba-svaba nije iz Istocne Nemacke?

I četvrtinom slovenskog porekla ako se ne varam. Mislim, očev otac

А презиме првобитно гласило... Мркела?


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by KinderLad on Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:38 pm

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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Santino on Mon Jan 15, 2018 5:40 pm


nema, sad je mrkela i kraj.


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Kondo on Mon Jan 15, 2018 6:32 pm

baba mitra


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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Filipenko on Mon Jan 15, 2018 8:12 pm

Džaba, protestantski sveštenizam kao karijera potire sve slovensko i uopšte pristojno u osobi.
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Kondo on Mon Jan 15, 2018 8:22 pm

majku mu, jeste protestantkinja. taman sam pomislio da si se navukao na tanak led.


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I was faced with a choice at a difficult age

Would I write a book? Or should I take to the stage?
But in the back of my head I heard distant feet
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Re: EU - what's next?

Post by Filipenko on Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:53 pm

Od Poljaka katolika gori su samo oni koji pređu da služe okupatoru i prihvate islam protestantizam. I to pandur, kao taj njen deda.

Re: EU - what's next?

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